Kennebec Valley Chamber

Serving the Kennebec Valley, Maine Region

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Friday Report ~ October 16, 2015

Getting the Job Done - I know I often refer to my time in the service. It obviously left an indelible impression on me, and shaped many of my opinions on work ethic and professionalism.  There is a very unique style that permeates all of the branches of military service. That is the "get the job done" mentality. This mentality is not automatic and often takes some added intervention to instill this attribute in our younger recruits.
As a junior officer, I was placed in charge of our "1st Lieutenant" division at my squadron. This division was often the home to the youngest new squadron members and had the glorious task of keeping the squadron spaces clean and running a small convenience shop that sold sandwiches, coffee and similar snack foods. Assisting me in running this division was a senior enlisted petty officer who we affectionately called "Disgruntled Don". He was close to retirement and was the epitome of the "Salty Dog" that you envision when you think of a sailor.
It was relatively early one afternoon when one of the youngest members of my division walked into the workspace that Don and I shared, grabbed her cover (Navy term for hat) and said "Okay, I've done my eight hours, I'm going home." Before I had a chance to process what was happening, a booming voice came from Don's desk "FREEZE SAILOR!" Startled, she indeed froze. I leaned around the partition and looked at Don. In the kindest voice he said "Sir, would you be so kind as to give us a minute? I don't think this conversation is one you need to be a part of."  Being a smart junior officer, I promptly grabbed my coffee cup and shuffled out the door, closing it behind me. As I strolled down the hall, I could hear the 'training' happening in my office.
The point that Don chose to make, was that being in the service is not an hourly assignment. We had a job to do and we stayed until it was done. Every job in the squadron, no matter how small, contributed to the overall mission of the squadron and provided all the other departments the support they needed to make our squadron mission a success.
A true professional carries this attitude with them in all that they do. Sadly, many businesses are inundated with folks who are simply punching the clock and don't have the motivation to go the extra mile for their organization. In my post military career, I have seen very few examples of this "get the job done" mentality, until now. 
Your Chamber Staff members, and Expo committee members have this work ethic in spades! The dedication of this team over the last few weeks approaching our Business Expo was nothing short of amazing. There were after hours efforts, long days, mid meeting texts and attention to detail that rival the most effective military organization. I am extremely grateful and can't thank them enough.
Take a minute to recognize the folks on your team who "get the job done". These folks are the secret to your success and you need to bend over backwards to ensure that they feel supported and appreciated, they would be impossible to replace.